Not sure if it’s Groucho, Harpo, Chico, or Zeppo…

I didn’t know what a Marxophone was until I watched this video, and then as soon as I heard it, I said “Oh! It’s that instrument they play in the suspenseful parts of all of those spooky movies!”

You’ll probably do the same.

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I dare the PRMC to find a backmasked message in this one…

Rob Scallon, who gave us that awesome banjo cover of Slayer’s Raining Blood (which was probably the most posted video to my FB wall of 2014) has done a video where he plays all of the parts of “Enter Sandman” backwards and then reverses them into a cover that would be creepy in a Twin-Peaks-ish way if not for all of the silly string, styrofoam peanuts, and pretzels.

Bach Prelude No. 1, on Boomwhackers

I’m not exactly sure what a boomwhacker is, but juggling troupe Les Objets Volants sure can play a mean Bach Prelude with them!

Better than Belushi would have done it…

Samuraiguitarist performs Beethoven’s Für Elise on five adjacent, alternate-tuned, and capoed guitars, and never even has to use his katana.  I have to say it’s a good day.

Peaches played on peaches

…but not by Presidents.

Andrew Huang and Jan Willem Kolkman created a MIDI controller using peach halves and slices of peach pie as triggers to perform a cover of the Presidents of the United States of America’s hit “Peaches” in a grocery store.

They get my vote. Next I’d like to see them cover the Smashing Pumpkins.

Find out more on how they did it (and watch the original video) at Laughing Squid.

Swept away, socially

Discarded street sweeper bristles are repurposed into a musical instrument called the Social Lamellaphone, which is designed to encourage people to play it in social groups. Think of a giant, circular African thumb piano, and you’ll have the right idea.

Bop with one eye open

I love it when people take current music back to its roots. Like how these ladies perform Metallica in the original Doo Wop format.

Nobody’s business but the Turks

Görkem Şen is the Turkish designer of the Yabahar, an unusual instrument composed of drum heads, large springs, and a fretted neck, that can be played in numerous ways.  He demonstrates some of those ways in this video.

Take one down, pass it around…

Upon mentioning that I would be relaunching Parts Unknown, my friend Joy decided to live up to her namesake and send me some joy in the form of YouTube videos.

First she send me this marvelous clip of a trio of musicians doing a very animated performance of Flight of the Bumblebee on a large assortment of bottles:

I responded in kind with this clip of a man performing Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 in G minor, First Movement, while rollerblading between rows of bottles:

…and Joy rebutted with this clip of an Australian beer commercial featuring an entire orchestra of people playing bottles in various ways

And that’s all for now. Remember to recycle!

If a wooden ball rolls in the forest…

Maybe they weren’t actually trying to put the old zen koan to the test when these creative folks decided to build this very long xylophone that plays Bach’s Cantata 147 when a wooden ball is rolled down it. In fact, it’s pretty clear that it was really done as a commercial for a limited edition mobile phone.  But zen or no zen, the result is still beautiful.

Via thefoxisblack